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1-7 of 7 Results from ReadWriteThink

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  1. Professional Development | Grades   3 – 12  |  Professional Library  |  Journal
    Authoring With Video
    Use a video-based platform as an inspiration for writing.
  2. Professional Development | Grades   2 – 5  |  Professional Library  |  Journal
    Digital Readers: The Next Chapter in E-Book Reading and Response
    This article discusses the use of digital e-book readers in the classroom.
  3. Professional Development | Grades   1 – 3, 5  |  Professional Library  |  Journal
    Exploring the Use of the iPad for Literacy Learning
    The goal of this investigation was to explore how a fourth grade teacher could integrate iPads into her literacy instruction to simultaneously teach print-based and digital literacy goals.
  4. Professional Development | Grades   3 – 8  |  Professional Library  |  Journal
    Lights, Cameras, Pencils! Using Descriptive Video to Enhance Writing
    Read and write with the movies using an innovative technology called Descriptive Video.
  5. Professional Development | Grades   3 – 5  |  Professional Library  |  Journal
    Poetry on the Screen
    Find practical suggestions for using technology to enhance the love of poetry.
  6. Professional Development | Grades   3 – 5  |  Professional Library  |  Journal
    SEARCHing for an Answer: The Critical Role of New Literacies While Reading on the Internet
    This article shows how to integrate a "SEARCH" framework to help students develop the new literacy skills that reading on the Internet requires.
  7. Professional Development | Grades   5 – 8  |  Professional Library  |  Journal
    Technology That Powers Up Learning
    By designing lessons to activate prior knowledge and linking these activities to reading and writing, teachers found that students were more engaged, that they learned more material more quickly, and that they more willingly incorporated reading into their lives.